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Webinar: Approach to Intellectual Property Rights in China – Strategic Policy Lessons for the World

Saturday, 29 May 2021, 5PM to 6.30PM IST Though the legal systems which are responsible for the protection of intellectual property rights in China and India are similar there are some major differences. While India pitched Make in India, China went for D

Intellectual property has assumed a vital role with the rapid pace of technological, scientific and medical innovation that we are witnessing today. Moreover, changes in the global economic environment have influenced the development of business models where intellectual property is a central element establishing value and potential growth. The economic growth, financial incentive and motivation for advanced innovations entail proficient, directed and relevant guidance in the field of Intellectual Property Rights. In India several new legislations for the protection of intellectual property rights (IPRs) have been passed to meet the international obligations under the WTO Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS).

While India became a member of the World Trade Organisation (WTO) in 1995, China did so in 2001. Membership in the WTO requires member nations to establish intellectual property (IP) laws whose effect is in line with minimum standards. Though the legal systems which are responsible for the protection of intellectual property rights in China and India are similar there are some major differences. While India pitched Make in India, China went for Design in China and was accused of major IPR violations causing serious suspicions in the west about the seriousness of China to comply with global IPR standards.

In the past decade, China tried to indicate that it is serious about IPR. For India, Intellectual Property (IP) plays a significant role not only to protect the rights of innovators but also to encourage the inception of new inventions under Indian Prime Minister’s Atmanirbhar Bharat (Self-Reliant India). It would directly boost up the economic industry that would create more employment, better GDP, and would attract investments.

While a study of these two mega countries with such diverse dimensions and magnitudes can never be truly comprehensive, a joint effort by the Chennai Centre for China Studies in collaboration with Surana & Surana International Attorneys attempts to explore the landscape of IPR, China’s effort to dominate IPR regime and compare the IPR in China & India by critically looking at the economic and legal realities. Offering policy inputs for India and attempting to answer the question of how innovation can best be transformed into IPR, and how IPR can best be utilised to encourage innovation.

Please contact Deepa Rajagopal drl.admin@lawindia.com for the meeting link.

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Posted by Christian Tyler Campbell

2021-05-25 04:23:42